orders placed before 9am are dispatched same day

Free UK Delivery on orders over £9.95 Retailing Quality Soft Toys Since 1993 The UK's Largest Selection of Hansa Products

Soft Toy Frogmouth by Hansa (20cm) 7929

Product ID: 1066
£26.99
In stock and ready to dispatch
Quantity: - +

Hansa

Free UK Delivery

Worldwide Shipping

Product Information
Frogmouth Facts

Manufacturer: Hansa
Category: Birds

This unusual Frogmouth Bird by Hansa has a jointed head and support in its legs so can stand unaided once balanced.It has airbrushed detailing around its face and down its wings to add to the realism.

Made from the finest materials to the highest standards.

Size approx. 9.5" (24cm) in height and 13"(33cm) in length from beak to tip of tail.

  • European safety standards EN71 BS5665
  • Carries the CE label so it safe for children (not under 36 months)
  • Surface washable
  • Quality item with airbrushed details

The frogmouths are a group of nocturnal birds related to the nightjars. They are found from the Indian Subcontinent across Southeast Asia to Australia.

The tawny frogmouth is an adaptable bird inhabiting a variety of habitats throughout Australia and Tasmania. They dwell in forests, scrubland, eucalyptus and acacia woodlands, and suburban parks. The only places it avoids are treeless areas or dense rainforests.

Tawny frogmouths nest in trees, usually in the fork of horizontal branches. Their nests are made of sticks, and sometimes padded with their own feathers, which they camouflage with lichen, moss, and spider webs. Both parents incubate the clutch. When hatched, the young are covered with down and remain in the nest until able to fly.

Often mistaken for owls, these unique birds are part of the nightjar, nighthawks, and whippoorwill family. Their unusual appearance serves as effective camouflage during the day while perching in trees. During the day, these birds usually sleep in a sedentary position.

When disturbed, they raise their head and stiffen their body, simulating a branch. This behavior is called "stumping." These birds may emit a soft warning buzz, similar to a bee, when startled. These birds are normally monogamous, communicating with a low, grunting "oom-oom-oom" call.

...